Litigation Against Conspirators in the Assassination of Oscar Romero

  As previously mentioned, the Truth Commission for El Salvador named Alvaro Saravia, an aide to Roberto d’Aubuisson, as one of the participants in the plot to assassinate Archbishop Oscar Romero.[1] When the Truth Commission report was released in March 1993, criminal charges against Saravia were being considered by the Salvadoran courts. Soon thereafter, however, … Continue reading Litigation Against Conspirators in the Assassination of Oscar Romero

Salvadoran Judicial Investigation and Prosecution of National Guardsmen for the Murders of the Four American Churchwomen

We have examined the Salvadoran mission work of the four American churchwomen, their brutal December 1980 murders and the non-judicial investigations of this horrendous crime.[1] Now we look at the Salvadoran judicial investigation and prosecutions of five of their National Guardsmen for this crime. Judicial Investigation The judicial investigation started in late April 1981, when … Continue reading Salvadoran Judicial Investigation and Prosecution of National Guardsmen for the Murders of the Four American Churchwomen

The Cuban Revolution and Religion

Minneapolis’ Westminster Presbyterian Church since 2002 has had a partnership with a Presbyterian-Reformed church in Matanzas, Cuba,  a city of approximately 150,000 on the north shore of the island about  56 miles east of Havana.[1] The existence of this partnership and my going on three Westminster mission trips to Cuba–November 2002, January 2004 and October/November … Continue reading The Cuban Revolution and Religion

Former Salvadoran Vice-Minister of Defense Held Liable by U.S. Courts for $6 Million for Torture and Extrajudicial Killing

On November 27, 1980, Manuel Franco and five other leaders of the Frente Democratico Revolucionario (FDR), a group opposed to the Salvadoran government, were abducted in San Salvador and then tortured and executed.  The Truth Commission for El Salvador found that these crimes had been committed by one or more of the country’s public security … Continue reading Former Salvadoran Vice-Minister of Defense Held Liable by U.S. Courts for $6 Million for Torture and Extrajudicial Killing

My Pilgrimage to El Salvador, April 1989

For my second Salvadoran asylum case, I decided that I needed to go to El Salvador to do investigations for the case and to learn more about the country. In April 1989 I made my first of six trips to the country. I went with a group led by Minneapolis’ Center for Global Education at … Continue reading My Pilgrimage to El Salvador, April 1989

El Salvador’s General Amnesty Law in U.S. Federal Court Cases

We have examined El Salvador’s adoption of its General Amnesty Law, litigation in its courts regarding the validity of that Law under its own legal system and its impact on the defendants who had been convicted for involvement in the murders of the Jesuit priests.[1] The General Amnesty Law also has been invoked by Salvadoran … Continue reading El Salvador’s General Amnesty Law in U.S. Federal Court Cases

Oscar Romero’s Opposition

In 1979-1980, Archbishop Oscar Romero was a passionate, persistent, public, brave critic of the human rights violations by the government and the paramilitary groups in El Salvador.[1] Such conduct did not go unchallenged. Many local newspapers criticized Romero in hostile terms. They called him “a demagogic and violent Archbishop . . . who preached terrorism … Continue reading Oscar Romero’s Opposition